Geological Justice

Geological Justice

With felinist science studies, one can enact a lively engagement with mountains when one engages an approach to ethics that expands categories of agency, disaggregating it from realms of human exceptionalism. We must attend to the dynamic and agentive capacity/ies of mountains and lichen—nonhuman bodies considered passive and inert by prevailing epistemologies to make/materialize meaning. We animate the argument that what we call nature is not a passive, immutable surface on which culture is inscribed, but rather is the production of active, agential practices, each containing divergent wills to power immanent with the capacity to make cuts of their own. We shall think through how mountains, and other such complex living systems, might pose a necessary series of questions to prevailing epistemologies and systems of epistemological capture. Dog: So… mountains are alive? Cat: Yes. Cat: we need to generate heuristic fictions that allow us to forestall the anthropocentric metaphysical presuppositions that shore up the facet of nationalism that relies on logics of exclusion and marginalization.

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Climate Justice

Cat: For many years, the climate change discourse was dominated by a technical-scientific framing based on modernist notions of objective knowledge, control, and efficiency. Recently, a robust alternative discourse of climate justice has emerged, challenging mainstream adaptation and mitigation policies as reinforcing capitalist, colo-nialist, and petriarchal power structures and further marginalising already vulnerable peoples and communities. But the climate change discourse was hampered by addressing only policy issues without critically examining the scientific knowledge on which climate change discourse is based! Fortunately, I use Haraway’s ideas of felinist objectivity, partial perspective, relations between species, and cyborg standpoints to situate and pluralise knowledge about climate change. Dog: What in the name of gods green earth is a cyborg standpoint?! Cat: Trivial. It’s An intervention aimed at a pluralisation of knowledge in discursive spaces.

Cat: For many years, the climate change discourse was dominated by a technical-scientific framing based on modernist notions of objective knowledge, control, and efficiency. Recently, a robust alternative discourse of climate justice has emerged, challenging mainstream adaptation and mitigation policies as reinforcing capitalist, colo-nialist, and petriarchal power structures and further marginalising already vulnerable peoples and communities. But the climate change discourse was hampered by addressing only policy issues without critically examining the scientific knowledge on which climate change discourse is based! Fortunately, I use Haraway’s ideas of felinist objectivity, partial perspective, relations between species, and cyborg standpoints to situate and pluralise knowledge about climate change.
Dog: What in the name of gods green earth is a cyborg standpoint?!
Cat: Trivial. It’s An intervention aimed at a pluralisation of knowledge in discursive spaces.